Downtown Get Down brings music to square

By Jose Gonzalez
Verge Reporter

Downtown Get Down, Charleston’s newest music festival, takes over the town square this weekend.

The festival starts with a free pre-party today throughout Charleston’s town square.

Most of the musical performances will be throughout the day Saturday.
 Mac’s Uptowner features bands like Hot Sauce Jones, Afternoon Moon, and Thinner Teed.

Indio Cigar Factory features bands like Muddy Grove and The Stationary.
Friends & Co. features bands like Moon Dogs, Deliver The Fallen, and Maylae.

Roc’s Blackfront features bands like J Boozer, The Staff Blues Band, and Mustache.

Pre-sale wristbands start at $10 and will be sold at Friends & Co., Mac’s Uptowner, Roc’s Blackfront, Indio Cigar Factory, and Positively 4th Street Records, today. They will be $15 at the door.

Lucas Thomas, promoter for the festival, said his goal is to make Downtown Get Down its own identity as opposed to other Charleston music festivals such as Square Fest.  
 
“It’s no different than past music festivals,” Thomas said. “We’re trying to make it its own thing. It’s a good way to get Eastern students familiar with the bands and the downtown area bars.” 
 
Thomas said the proceeds from the wristband and merchandise sales will go directly to the bands after initial costs are taken care of.  
Kevin McGugan, owner of Mac’s Uptowner, said he has been providing Charleston a place to go listen to music for 15 years.
 
“We feel we started the music scene with Acoustic Sundays,” McGugan said.  
McGugan said Downtown Get Down will not be his first festival, as he has hosted music festivals since starting the bar. He will feature all types of music.  

“It sells the fact that they’re willing to put on shows that students want to see,” McGugan said. “It brings students in to listen to music in Charleston.”
 
Kylie Knoop, assistant manager of Roc’s Blackfront, said they started having music on a regular basis in 2009. The majority of musicians came from Coles County.  

“We didn’t want to be genre specific,” Knoop said. “The more local they are though, the more of a leg up they got, but we also wanted to take care of the local economy.”  

Kyle Daniell, the drummer for Hot Sauce Jones, said Downtown Get Down will be his first time playing in Charleston.  

Daniell said they have played at the Canopy Club in Champaign and twice at the Iron Post in Urbana, as well as performing an outdoor festival in Terre Haute, Ind.  

Daniell said the band’s name came from their keyboard player’s nickname.  
“We needed a name and it stuck to us,” Daniell said.
 
Leslie Francis, vocalist for Muddy Grove, said she and her brother started Muddy Grove because their entire family was involved in music.  

Francis said her and her brother started Muddy Grove in 2008 with her husband, Caleb, and drummer Jeremy McConnaha.

Unlike Daniell and Hot Sauce Jones, Francis said Muddy Grove has a following around Mattoon and Charleston. They have played at 7th Street Underground, Indio Cigar Factory, and Christmas on the Square.  

Daniell said he hopes Downtown Get Down will help students and residents become more familiar with their music, and rise to a level like Thinner Teed is at.  

“We’re trying to get our name out there and get a following,” Daniell said. “We’re the only jam band in Charleston since The Fuzz.”  

McGugan said he is participating in Downtown Get Down for the interests of the community and the students.
 
“If we don’t do this for the community and students, then we lose the people,” McGugan said. “We have to provide the entertainment needed to relax and go home safely. The purpose of this is the awareness of good entertainment and that they keep the population here and safe. I don’t want to see anyone hurt, I want to see people around good entertainment.”  
Knoop said they are all involved as a collaborative effort in order to work together and promote Charleston.  

“It’s really our chance to work together and show what we have to offer,” Knoop said.  

Knoop added Charleston’s music scene is considered safer than the surrounding cities.    

“It’s safer, less travel, and you can support your local musicians,” Knoop said. “Each venue has a different genre. The music chosen fits our style and venue. It’s more universally appreciated and it will feel more like a musical crawl.”  
    
Jose Gonzalez can be reached at 581-2812 or
jgonzalez@eiu.edu

Review: Blink-182 grows up with newest album

By Ashley Holstrom
Verge Reporter

Blink-182’s sixth album, Neighborhoods, is well worth the eight-year wait since the last album.

The band has seriously evolved in that time, writing music with deeper meaning than how many hot dogs their grandpa ate on Labor Day.

Those eight years allowed a lot of changes to occur. Tom DeLonge created the electronic Angels & Airwaves, and Mark Hoppus and Travis Barker formed the pop-punk +44. Neighborhoods embodies the mashing together of those two groups and matured understandings of music.

The album isn’t as upbeat as the band’s earlier work, or as serious as 2003’s self-titled album, which makes it has the perfect amount of spunk and mellow jams.

The first single, “Up All Night,” takes some getting used to. The band is actually, like, musically talented as a whole now.

Hoppus and DeLonge aren’t just yelling about first dates and naked girls anymore. They’re singing eloquent poetry about adulthood.

Every song has something different to offer. “Heart’s All Gone” is overpowered by Barker’s intense drumming. “Snake Charmer” has DeLonge’s eerie sound and lyrics. “MH 4.18.2011” is full of Hoppus’s encouragement to “Hold on, the worst is yet to come.”

I’ve had the album on repeat for the majority of the week, and I can’t pick any favorites–just songs I love a teensy bit more than I love the rest.

This new Blink is fantastic. Whether you were a teeny-bopper fan who grew out of it or have stuck with the band through its evolution, you need to give it at least one listen-through.

Ashley Holstrom can be reached at 581-2812 or
alholstrom@eiu.edu

Review: Greives, Budo bring passion

By Sara Jacobsen
Verge Reporter

Ever since I was given the opportunity to hang out with them on the 2011 Vans Warped Tour, hip-hop duo Grieves and Budo have been somewhat of an obsession of mine.

Their Rhymesayers Entertainment debut release “Together/Apart” quickly made it into my daily music rotation and I have reason to believe it’s there to stay.

The Seattle-based pair consists of Benjamin Laub (Grieves) and producer and multi-instrumentalist Josh Karp (Budo).

The two began working together toward the end of 2008 and “Together/Apart” began taking shape. Grieves delivered one of the boldest and most emotionally charged albums of 2011.

“Together/Apart” deals a lot with the idea of growing up. More specifically, not growing up too fast. The album’s first track, “Light Speed,” is entirely about this idea.

In the song, Grieves paints a self-portrait detailing what growing up was like for him beginning “when mom was a religion and happiness was a fact” and ending at age 19 in Seattle “with a head full of drum beats.” Because “Light Speed” deals so much with Grieves’ own personal life, it perfectly sets the stage for the rest of the album.

“Bloody Poetry” may be one of the album’s strongest tracks, both lyrically and musically. The song shows off Grieves’ lyrical dexterity by featuring a dark yet undeniably catchy hook.

Somber piano chords and simplistic drumbeats coupled with vivacious horn flourishes, typical of Budo’s production, give “Bloody Poetry” a sound that is not often heard in conventional hip-hop music.

Unlike “Light Speed” and “Bloody Poetry,” “Together/Apart’s” third single, “On the Rocks” offers a more up-tempo beat.

Grieves uses a combination of synthesizer and bass to create a rhythm that will definitely catch the listeners attention.

Although the lyrics may not be the happiest, “On the Rocks” is one of those captivating songs that you’ll want to listen to on repeat.
Currently, Grieves and Budo are on a headlining tour in support of “Together/Apart.”

Having been witness to what these two are capable of on stage, I would highly recommend attending one of their shows if ever given the opportunity.

They are two of the most passionate musicians that I have ever had the pleasure of meeting and they bring that same passion on stage with them.

Sara Jacobsen can be reached at 581-2812 or
sjacobsen@eiu.edu

Amazing goal earns Hinds award

Senior midfielder Jonathan Hinds looks to make a pass during the game against Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis on Sunday. (Danny Damiani | The Daily Eastern News)

By Rob Mortell/Staff Reporter
Senior midfielder Jonathan Hinds provided one of the most spectacular goals for Eastern’s men’s soccer team this season.

Not only was his first goal a game-winner over non-conference opponent Lipscomb, but he flipped backwards connecting on a perfectly executed bicycle kick.

It was that “SportsCenter”-worthy play that earns Hinds this week’s Top Cat award.

“(The ball) hit my chest, my back was to the goal and all I was thinking was the goal is that way,” Hinds said. “I didn’t care that it was behind me.”

Hinds was set up off a corner kick that was controlled by freshman midfielder Will Butler.

Butler saw Hinds in front of the net and set him up with a pass that bounced into Hinds chest.

The rare play excited Hinds’ teammates on the bench, sending them jumping up and down on the sidelines.

Hinds said he doesn’t really practice bicycle kicks, but when he is in the flow of the game he will go for anything.

Head coach Adam Howarth said the goal was a terrific way to finish the match.

“(The goal) was fantastic,” Howarth said.

Even though Hinds made a remarkable goal, the more important aspect of it was getting the 2-1 win for his team. The win evened the Panthers record at 4-4-1.

Hinds said it was a great win in front of the home crowd, but it is just a stepping stone towards the team’s real goal: making the Summit League tournament. They are still 0-0-1 in League play.

Hinds said for the team to be successful the Panthers need all of their players to contribute.

“Everyone out here knows how to step up and make plays,” Hinds said. “That is the key to this year.”

Eastern is making more plays than last season, scoring 12 goals in nine games this season, whereas it tallied nine goals in seventeen games last year.

This season the Panthers also returned to the Summit League. They moved to the Missouri Valley Conference since 1996, where they won five conference titles.

The team travels to play in-state rival Western Illinois Friday.

Rob Mortell can be reached at 581-7944 or at rdmortell@eiu.edu

Column: Rugby team paving their own path

By Jordan Pottorff
Staff Reporter

The Panthers are off to a good start so far this season, but they are coming off of a weekend in which the game was postponed. That could have an effect on the Panthers heading into their first road game of the year.

The Panthers are set to head north to Champaign, to take on the University of Illinois Fighting Illini on Saturday afternoon.  The Panthers have got the best of the Illini in each of the previous four meetings, but that could all change come Saturday afternoon.

The Panthers remain undefeated this season, but consistency has been a problem with head coach Frank Graziano’s team.  Eastern is known for its run and gun, high scoring style of play, and this year’s team has not followed suit.  The Panthers have been held in the 20-point range two times this season and have failed to top the 50-point mark so far this season.  Two of the three games this season have not been decided until late in the second half which is a rarity for the premier team in NCAA Division-I women’s rugby.

I’m not saying that this year’s team is not talented and capable of recording another perfect season. I am just saying that this years team is creating an identity of their own and playing a different style of rugby.  This year’s team is very young and they are continuing to improve on a game-to-game basis.  This team is unproven on the road and the confidence they have playing at Lakeside Field may not transfer over when they are the visiting team.

I would like to think that the Panthers used the week off to rest and fine tune the things that have caused problems so far this season, but I won’t know the answer until the final whistle blows this weekend.  Although the 2011 version of Panther rugby is creating their own identity, I fully expect the Panthers to continue their dominance of women’s rugby.  The wins should keep on coming, but the weekly blowouts may be a thing of the past.

Jordan Pottorff can be reached at 581-7944 or jbpottorff@eiu.edu.


Conference teams prep for weekend

By Olivia Sloss/Staff Reporter

The Eastern men’s and women’s cross country teams will compete this Friday at the Notre Dame Invitational in South Bend, Ind. Competing also in this meet from the Ohio Valley Conference will be the Eastern Kentucky men.

Jacksonville State, Tennessee State and Tennessee Tech will compete in the Tennessee Tech Invitational in Cookeville, Tenn. on Friday.

Austin Peay, the Eastern Kentucky women, Morehead State, Murray State, Southeast Missouri, Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville and UT Martin will compete Saturday at the Greater Louisville Classic in Louisville, Ky.

The Male Adidas OVC Runner of the Week went to Max Wieser of Southeast Missouri.

Wieser was the top finisher in the 8K for Southeast Missouri State in Saturday’s Saluki Invitational in Carbondale with a 23rd finish out of 72 total runners in a time of 28:06.

No other men were nominated.

The Female Adidas OVC Runner of the Week went to Rebekah Lawson of Southeast Missouri.

Lawson was the top finisher in the 5K for Southeast Missouri State in Saturday’s Saluki Invitational in Carbondale, Ill with a 22nd finish out of 83 total runners in a time of 20:46.

No other women were nominated.

Week three of the United States Track and Field and Cross Country Coaches Association of America (USTFCCCAA) rankings of the season were released Monday with no new changes.

The top five men’s teams and the top nine women’s teams stood their ground from last week’s standing.

The Eastern men’s team is unranked in the USTFCCCAA Midwest Regional polls.

The top 10 men’s team consists of Oklahoma State, Oklahoma, Minnesota, Iowa State, Illinois, Tulsa, Kansas, Iowa, Southern Illinois and Nebraska at No. 10.

The remaining five include South Dakota State, Drake, Loyola-Chicago, Illinois Chicago and North Dakota State.

The Eastern women’s team is unranked in the USTFCCCAA Midwest Regional polls.

The top 10 women’s team consists of Iowa State, Oklahoma State, Minnesota, Iowa, Tulsa, Kansas, Northwestern, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Kansas State at No. 10.

The remaining five include Illinois, Illinois State, Wichita State, Missouri and Saint Louis.

The only men’s team of the OVC to be ranked in the USTFCCCAA rankings was Eastern Kentucky for the second week straight.

Eastern Kentucky is ranked third in the Southeast Region after Virginia and North Carolina State.

In the national rankings that were released today, the Colonels are ranked in the No. 26 spot, which is a spot up from last week’s 27th ranking.

None of the OVC women teams are ranked.

Olivia Sloss can be reached at 581-7944 or oesloss@eiu.edu


Vogel earns defensive honor

By Dominic Renzetti/Sports Editor

Sophomore Brenna Vogel was named Adidas Ohio Valley Conference Defender of the Week after her performance against Tennessee Tech. The match saw Vogel record her first career goal as a Panther in the match against the Golden Eagles.

The Panthers would record their first of two shutout wins of the weekend, beating Tennessee Tech 2-0, while also knocking off another OVC opponent, Jacksonville State, by the same score.

In the match against Tennessee Tech, Vogel played a total of 151 minutes.

This season, Vogel has played a total of 755 minutes this season, starting  in every one of the team 11 matches this season. Vogel has taken a total of four shots this season, two of which were on goal, with only one connecting for a goal. Vogel has two total points this season.

Vogel is currently tied for second place on the team with her one goal. She is tied with four other players behind junior forward Kristin Germann, who leads the team with four goals so far this season.

Vogel’s four shots rank tenth on the team, with Germann again leading the team with 21. Germann also leads the team with shots-on-goal with 13, while Vogel is currently ninth on the team.

The team will be in action again this Friday, taking on another OVC opponent, Southeast Missouri. The match will be the Panthers’, who currently have a record of 3-6-2, conference road match of the season. The Panthers are 2-0-0 in OVC play so far this season.

Dominic Renzetti can be reached at 581-7944 or dcrenzetti@eiu.edu.